Amazing info about your body

What are some mind blowing amazing facts about the human body

Your Brain keeps developing until your late 40s.

If the human eye was a digital camera it would have 576 Megapixels.

If uncoiled, the DNA in all the cells in your body would stretch 10 billions, from here to Pluto and back.

Everyday, your heart creates enough energy to drive a truck for 20 miles.

Our Brain uses 20% of the total oxygen and blood in our body.

Heart keeps beating even if it is separated from the body because of its own electrical impulse.

The human baby has over 60 more bones than an adult.

In a lifetime, your Brain’s long-term memory can hold as many as 1 million billion separate bits of information.

An adult human being has around 7,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 atoms.

Having excessive body hair is linked to higher intellect.

An average person produces about 28,000 liters of saliva in a lifetime.

Sleeping less than 7 hours each night reduces your life expectancy.

 

And now, think about all that.

Dogs like their business aligned

This “scientific” research is true. It is not fake. You may believe it or not, but here it is:
Several mammalian species spontaneously align their body axis with respect to the Earth’s magnetic field (MF) lines in diverse behavioral contexts. Magnetic alignment is a suitable paradigm to scan for the occurrence of magnetosensitivity across animal taxa with the heuristic potential to contribute to the understanding of the mechanism of magnetoreception and identify further functions of magnetosensation apart from navigation. With this in mind we searched for signs of magnetic alignment in dogs. We measured the direction of the body axis in 70 dogs of 37 breeds during defecation (1,893 observations) and urination (5,582 observations) over a two-year period. After complete sampling, we sorted the data according to the geomagnetic conditions prevailing during the respective sampling periods. Relative declination and intensity changes of the MF during the respective dog walks were calculated from daily magnetograms. Directional preferences of dogs under different MF conditions were analyzed and tested by means of circular statistics.

Results
Dogs preferred to excrete with the body being aligned along the North–South axis under calm MF conditions. This directional behavior was abolished under unstable MF. The best predictor of the behavioral switch was the rate of change in declination, i.e., polar orientation of the MF.

Conclusions
It is for the first time that (a) magnetic sensitivity was proved in dogs, (b) a measurable, predictable behavioral reaction upon natural MF fluctuations could be unambiguously proven in a mammal, and (c) high sensitivity to small changes in polarity, rather than in intensity, of MF was identified as biologically meaningful. Our findings open new horizons in magnetoreception research. Since the MF is calm in only about 20% of the daylight period, our findings might provide an explanation why many magnetoreception experiments were hardly replicable and why directional values of records in diverse observations are frequently compromised by scatter.

Source

A young pepper hero

A 19-year-old man was fatally shot and two other young people were wounded after a gunman entered the foyer at Otto Miller Hall on the Seattle Pacific University campus and started shooting Thursday afternoon. When he paused to reload, a student building monitor disarmed him. Meis is the student monitor who is credited with stopping the suspected gunman, Aaron R. Ybarra, 26, by pepper spraying him and tackling him.

The 22-year-old building monitor pepper-sprayed and tackled the gunman Thursday in Seattle Pacific University’s Otto Miller Hall, likely preventing further carnage, according to police and university officials.

Meis and other students subdued the gunman until officers arrived and handcuffed him moments later. Police said the shooter, who killed a 19-year-old man and wounded two other young people, had 50 additional shotgun shells and a hunting knife.

He told authorities after his arrest that he wanted to kill as many people as possible before taking his own life, Seattle police wrote in a statement filed in court Friday. Friends credited Meis with saving lives.

“I’m proud of the selfless actions that my roommate, Jon Meis, showed today taking down the shooter,” fellow student Matt Garcia wrote on Twitter. “He is a hero.” The suspect, 26-year-old Aaron R. Ybarra, has a long history of mental health problems for which he had been treated and medicated, said his attorney, public defender Ramona Brandes. He is on suicide watch at the jail.

“He is cognizant of the suffering of the victims and their families and the entire Seattle Pacific community,” Brandes said. “He is sorry.” Meis, a dean’s list electrical engineering student, was emotionally anguished but not injured in the shooting, Harborview Medical Center spokeswoman Susan Gregg said Friday. He was treated there and released.

Roman Kukhotskiy, 22, was in the building when the violence broke out. He said Meis is getting married this summer and has accepted a job with Boeing Co., where he has interned in previous years. “I was amazed that he was willing to risk all that for us,” Kukhotskiy said. “If Jon didn’t stop him, what’s to say? I could have been the next victim.”

The leafy campus of the private, Christian university about 10 minutes north of downtown Seattle was quiet the morning after the shooting, with a service held at midday. People stopped to pay their respects at a makeshift memorial near the science and engineering building where the shooting occurred.

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray identified the student killed as Paul Lee, a “Korean-American student with a bright future.” The gunman had just entered Otto Miller Hall when he opened fire in the foyer. Classes were taking place upstairs.

On Friday, Ybarra wore a protective vest at his appearance in a jailhouse courtroom. A judge found probable cause to keep him detained without bail at the King County Jail. Ybarra was hospitalized for mental health evaluations twice in recent years, said Pete Caw, assistant police chief in Ybarra’s hometown, the north Seattle suburb of Mountlake Terrace.

In 2010, officers responded after Ybarra, heavily intoxicated, called 911 to report that he “had a rage inside him” and wanted to hurt himself and others, according to a report released by Mountlake Terrace police.

In 2012, police found Ybarra lying in a roadway, again severely intoxicated. He told officers he wanted a SWAT team “to get him and make him famous,” a police report said. Both times, police took Ybarra to Swedish Hospital in Edmonds for evaluation, Caw said.

He was arrested on suspicion of DUI in nearby Edmonds in 2012, said Edmonds police Sgt. Mark Marsh. Ybarra’s family said in a statement they were shocked and saddened by the shootings. “We are crushed at the amount of pain caused to so many people,” the statement said. “To the victims and their families, our prayers are with you.”

Ybarra is not a Seattle Pacific student, police said. His friend Zack McKinley described him as “super happy and friendly,” The Seattle Times reported. McKinley said the attack was puzzling because Ybarra was happy to have just started a job bagging groceries. Ybarra could get emotionally low but had a good group of friends, McKinley said.

Late Thursday, investigators searched a Mountlake Terrace house believed to be tied to Ybarra. Wounded in the shooting were Sarah Williams, 19, who remained in intensive care Friday after a five-hour surgery, and Thomas Fowler, 24. Hospital spokeswoman Gregg said Fowler was discharged Friday afternoon.

Meis, who graduated from Seattle Christian Schools in SeaTac, kept a low profile the day after the shooting. An outgoing voice message at a phone listing for his parents’ home in Renton said, “We ask that you please respect our privacy during this time while we recover.” It solicited prayers for students and the family of the man killed.

Salomon Meza Tapia, a friend who serves with Meis on the board of a student engineers group, described him as a hardworking student who is “always super chill.” “I am not surprised he was cool and collected enough to take action,” he wrote in an email to The Associated Press. “I was in the building, and I can say he definitely saved our lives. I am thankful to be alive and thank God for Jon Meis’ courage and actions.”

Source

Master your job interview

1) Be Similar to The Interviewer

“Be yourself” can actually be a problem.

If you want to know how to ace a job interview it’s important to note that study after study shows the key to being liked and being more influential is similarity.

Research shows you can take advantage of this by researching the interviewer and coming across as similar to them:

After carefully transcribing and analyzing her interviews and field notes from observations in the firm, Rivera determined that, by the time a candidate had made it through the relevant resume screenings and landed an interview, her evaluation was not necessarily based on “maximizing skill—finding the person who was absolutely best at the soft or the hard dimensions of the job,” as Rivera puts it. Rather, the most common mechanism by which a candidate was evaluated was her similarity to her interviewer.

No lies are necessary. Think attitude.

Do they come across as aggressive and hard-charging or calm and passive? Do they come across as cultured or school of hard knocks?

2) Timing Matters

You might not have much control over this but make an effort to manipulate the timing to your advantage.

Research shows interviews go better when:

They’re earlier in the day.
The weather is good.
And when you’re not interviewed on the same day as your strongest competition.

3) Frame the Conversation

First impressions matter even more than you think. And once they’re set, they are very hard to resist. Mastering first impressions is a key part of learning how to ace a job interview.

Research shows they’re the most important part of any job interview:

By careful analysis, the researchers found that all of these factors influenced the final interview ratings, and that this was due to the way they shaped first impressions: after those first few minutes, there was little extra influence of these qualities across the rest of the interview.

Optimize first impressions from the outset by framing the conversation with a few well-rehearsed sentences regarding how you want to be perceived. This will end up being the structure the other person forms their memories around.

If you start out with a few well-rehearsed sentences about why you are the right person for the job, this first impression can help set the tone for your interview and for what is taken away from the meeting.

Persuasion expert Robert Cialdini, author of the classic book, Influence, slyly recommends asking them why they thought you might be good for the role.

After people make positive public statements about you they will subconsciously feel the need to not contradict them.

4) Feel Powerful

People who felt powerful before going into an interview performed better:

Priming participants with feelings of power improves professional interview outcomes… In both studies, unaware judges significantly preferred the power-primed applicants.

Remember: “fake it ’til you make it” works.

How can you make sure you feel powerful? Harvard researcher Amy Cuddy recommends doing a “power pose” in private before the interview:

Preparatory power posing:
take a few minutes before walking into a stressful interaction or situation to open up,
occupy more space,
and make yourself big
stand with your feet apart and your hands on your hips, or with your arms reaching up in a ‘V.’
sit with your legs in front of you, feet propped up on desk or a table, leaning back, with your hands on the back of your head, fingers interlaced, and elbows pointing out.

Try power poses in the elevator, a bathroom stall, the stairwell…wherever you can find two minutes of privacy.

Does striking poses in the bathroom sound silly to you? Don’t laugh — it works:

As predicted, high power posers performed better and were more likely to be chosen for hire, and this relationship was mediated only by presentation quality, not speech quality. Power pose condition had no effect on body posture during the social evaluation, thus highlighting the relationship between preparatory nonverbal behavior and subsequent performance.

What type of people naturally know how to ace a job interview? Narcissists.

Now you don’t want to be overbearing but better to toot your own horn than to have it go untooted:

Narcissists scored much higher in simulated job interviews than non-narcissists, researchers found. They pointed to narcissists’ innate tendency to promote themselves, in part by engaging and speaking at length, which implied confidence and expertise even when they were held to account by expert interviewers.

5) Have a Strong Handshake

Your handshake matters a lot more than you might think.

…experts at the University of Iowa analyzing interactions in job interviews declared handshakes “more important than agreeableness, conscientiousness, or emotional stability.”

And it’s correlated with getting an offer:

Five trained raters independently evaluated the quality of the handshake for each participant. Quality of handshake was related to interviewer hiring recommendations.

6) Know the Right Questions To Ask

Many people struggle with that moment in most interviews where they ask “Do you have any questions for us?”

This is not only a good time to get information but it’s a great time to impress them with an insightful question:

Thinking back to people who have been in this position previously, what differentiated the ones who were good from the ones who were really great?
How would you describe the culture of the company?
What do you expect me to accomplish in the first 60 to 90 days?

7) Know How To Negotiate Salary

“They need to like you.”

Here’s the equation for getting what you want. Cutting to the chase: You want to get more. You want more money, a better offer, a better deal; here are the components of what you need to do. First, they need to like you. That’s the first component. The things you do that make them like you less make it less likely that you are going to get what you want…

Source

Walmart Lets Kids Choose Their Own Holiday Toys

The Walmart toy department is taking their young customers very seriously. In an unprecendented move, giant retailer asked a group of 1,000 kids under 10 years old to play with a selection of toys and then rate their favorites.

The winning toys will be marketed for the holidays in a special “Chosen by Kids” section, the AP reports. Because the holidays account for about 40% of annual toy revenues, retailers are especially anxious to stock toys with broad appeal and to avoid being left with shelves full of duds at season’s end.

The toys chosen by the Walmart focus groups include a new Barbie Dreamhouse play set, a robot Furby, and FurReal Friends Cuddles My Giggly Monkey, a very affectionate toy  monkey.

[AP]